Courses Offered by Program

Anthropology (ANT) courses

  • ANT 100 World Cultures

    General Education Course (Focus on Cultural Competence).

    An exploration of cultural differences throughout the world, with emphasis on nonwestern societies, from the perspective of cultural anthropology.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 125 Exploring Our Human Ancestry

    General Education Course (Focus on Social and Behavioral Sciences).

    This course explores what it means to be human by tracing our biological and cultural roots. Topics include the evolutionary process; our place among the living primates; fossil and archaeological evidence of human ancestors; and the origins of language, society, and culture.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 226 Cultural Anthropology

    The comparative study of human society and culture, focusing on theories of culture and cultural institutions and ethnographic and cross-cultural methods of research.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 227 Biological Anthropology

    An examination of biological aspects of humanity from comparative and evolutionary perspectives. Topics include evolutionary theory, the origin and evolution of nonhuman primates and humans, primate behavior, biological variation among human populations, and anatomical and physiological influences on behavior.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 240 Introduction to Archaeology

    An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, issues, and ethics of archaeology-the study of cultures in the past from the remains they left behind. Topics will include archaeological survey, excavation, dating techniques, artifact analysis, conservation, and cultural adaptation and change.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 280 Linguistic Anthropology

    This course is an introduction to the field of linguistic anthropology, with special emphasis on language as a basic component of human culture. Subjects include the humanness of language, the study of linguistic structure, description and analysis of languages, origins of human speech, the history of languages and writing, the use of language in social relations, and the relationship among language, thought, and culture.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 301 Anthropology of Religion

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 226 or REL 210.

    Anthropological theory and cross-cultural comparison of religious belief and behavior, such as magic, sorcery, witchcraft, mythology, ritual, totemism, shamanism, cults and movements.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 302 Psychological Anthropology

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or 226.

    Cross-cultural and evolutionary perspectives on socialization, the self, personality, gender, normality, deviance, mental disorders, cognition, and emotion.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 309 Service Learning in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 30 hours and concurrent registration in an anthropology course designated as a service learning offering.

    An integrative learning experience which addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs by incorporating community service with classroom instruction. Includes 40 hours on-task service to a community organization, agency or public sector provider. The community service placement agency and service assignment will vary, dependent on the disciplinary course topic and learning objectives. May be repeated.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 320 Ethnography

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 226.

    In this course students will read, critique, and compare selected ethnographic accounts of societies around the world and explore ways in which anthropologists have written about and interpreted cultures.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 325 North American Indian Cultures

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 226.

    A survey and comparison of Native American societies and cultures in North America (north of Mexico), including their ecology, subsistence, technology, social organization, politics, and religion.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 326 Plains Indian Cultures

    This course examines the origins, development, and traditional cultures of Native American groups in the North American Plains region. Topics will include the prehistoric record, historical influences, material culture, subsistence, languages, social organization, trade, law and social control, warfare and alliances, art and religion.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 330 Peoples and Cultures

    Anthropological study of a cultural region of the world (such as the Caribbean, Latin America, or Southeastern Indians), including environment, subsistence, technology, economy, social and political organization, and religion. May be repeated when topic changes. Variable content course.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 331 Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean

    An introduction to the peoples, societies, and cultures of the Caribbean region, which includes the islands of the West Indies and portions of Central and South America. This course will examine the development of the region from prehistoric times to the present and the effects of the Atlantic slave trade, the African diaspora, sugar plantations, and Spanish, British, French, Dutch, and American colonialism on the region today.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 332 Peoples and Cultures of Africa

    An exploration of African societies (especially sub-Saharan), including family structure, gender relations, social and political organization, beliefs, economics, art, oral literature, music, dance, and other aspects of culture.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 334 Peoples and Cultures of Japan

    An anthropological survey of the culture and cultural development of the peoples of Japan, from prehistory to the present, including cultural ideology and ethos, social organization, major cultural principles, customs, religion, technology, material culture, and the arts.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 335 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 226.

    A survey presentation of key themes and problems to be found in the Middle East, ranging from the re-establishment of Israel to modernity and tradition in the greater Arab Near East. In addition, topics ranging from the individual to state formation will be discussed. Traditional society, customs, and historical patterns will be examined.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 340 Old World Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 240 or ANT 250.

    A detailed survey of prehistory in selected areas of Europe, Africa, the Middle East, the Far East, Australia and Oceania. Emphasis on the latest theoretical considerations and outstanding archaeological problems of each region.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 345 Historical Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 240.

    Historical archaeology investigates the emergence of the modern world over the past ca. 500 years through the study of the material traces of human behavior, in conjunction with the study of written and oral records. This course provides an in-depth introduction to the field of historical archaeology including its methods, theoretical approaches, debates, and applications. Key topics include the historical archaeology of colonialism, slavery, class, gender, ethnicity, consumerism, capitalism, and industrialization. By the end of the course, students will understand how archaeologists recover, analyze, and interpret historical artifacts.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 351 Field Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 125 or ANT 240; and permission.

    Field experience in the techniques, methods and theories of reconnaissance and excavation of archaeological sites. May be repeated to a total of 9 hours. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    3-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 355 Environmental Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 240 or BIO 122 or GLG 110 or GLG 171 or GRY 108 or GRY 142.

    This course focuses on the archaeological study of human interactions with the environment over long periods of time and in multiple settings. It will emphasize both the methods scientists in multiple disciplines use to reconstruct past environments and the conceptual frameworks that are relevant to understanding how people acted on and reacted to the changing world around them. As a holistic and diachronic study of the socio-natural system, environmental archaeology can provide unique perspectives on today's ecological challenges.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 360 North American Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 240.

    Americanist archaeology is distinctive as a set of theoretical and methodological orientations. This course illustrates those orientations through archaeological case studies of initial human migrations, hunting-and-gathering societies, the formation of more complex polities, and European colonialism in North America. The multiple contexts of archaeological research and its impacts on living people are also considered.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 363 Survey of Forensic Anthropology

    A survey of the scope of forensic anthropology, which deals with identification and interpretation of human skeletal remains in medico-legal contexts. Included in this course are both theoretical and practical components. Topics to be discussed include the history and ethics of forensic anthropology, forensic investigation, influence of activity and disease on bone, and human rights applications. Practical aspects cover identification of bones and features of the human skeleton; techniques for determining age, sex, stature and race, and distinguishing human from nonhuman skeletal remains.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 365 Human Variation

    Prerequisite: ANT 227, or BIO 101 and 111, or BIO 121, or BMS 100 and 101, or BMS 110 and 111.

    An examination of ways in which humans have adapted both genetically and physiologically to a wide variety of environments and how these adaptations have produced the biological variation seen in contemporary human populations. Major topics will include historical and current approaches to classifying human groups, human growth and development, adaptation and acclimatization to specialized environments, genetic disease, and tracing lineages through DNA analysis. It will also explore recent studies relating human biology to social constructs such as gender, race, ethnicity, and intelligence.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 370 The Living Primates

    Prerequisite: ANT 227 or BIO 122 or PSY 336.

    An introduction to the human species' closest relatives, the nonhuman primates (prosimians, monkeys, and apes); their taxonomy, distribution, morphology, ecology, evolution, behavior, and conservation.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 375 Human Evolution

    Prerequisite: ANT 227 or BIO 122.

    An exploration into the evolution of the human species, through examination of fossil and molecular evidence.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 380 Language and Culture

    Prerequisite: ANT 280 or ENG 296.

    Advanced study in linguistic anthropology on topics such as ethnographies of speaking, ethnolinguistics, language change and historical linguistics. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 381 Language, Thought, and Culture

    Prerequisite: ANT 280 or ENG 296.

    This course explores the relationship among language, thought, and culture; how language delineates underlying categories of human experience, and how language influences perspective on the world and everyday behavior. Specific topics will include linguistic relativity, the Whorf hypothesis, language and world-view, and metaphor.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 382 Writing, Literacy, and Orality

    Prerequisite: ANT 280 or ENG 296.

    This course explores the development and structure of writing systems around the world, and the relationship between writing systems and languages; the effects writing and literacy have had on social, political, and religious institutions, as well as on psychology and cognition; characteristics of oral societies; and knowledge, memory, and performance in oral vs. literate societies.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 390 Native American Code Talkers

    This course explores the use of Native American languages in U.S. military service during World War I and World War II. The cultural background of code talkers, their recruitment, use in combat situations and post war experiences will be examined, along with their unique status in Native American cultures and recent efforts to document and recognize them.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 397 Special Topics

    Selected topics such as primitive technology, cultural ecology and behavioral evolution. May be repeated to a total of 9 hours when topic changes. Variable content course.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 490 Field Experience in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Supervised group study and/or research in an off campus setting. A fee may be charged to cover travel expenses. May be repeated when subject changes.

    Credit hours:
    1-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 499 Internship in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 18 hours of ANT and permission of instructor.

    This independent study course provides an opportunity to earn academic credit for supervised work experience related to anthropology with an approved business, industry, organization, or government agency. May be repeated to a total of six hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hours:
    1-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 500 Applied Cultural Anthropology

    Prerequisite: ANT 226 and 75 hours.

    An introduction to the field of applied anthropology, which is the application of anthropological methods, theories, and knowledge to the problems of society. Applied anthropology is the fastest growing field of anthropology today because it provides a basis for many careers. Course will examine the role of cultural anthropologists in areas such as foreign aid and development projects, migrant and refuge services, disasters and humanitarian assistance, human rights issues, business and industry, health and medicine, tourism, environmental protection, fisheries management, the military, and cultural preservation. May be taught concurrently with ANT 600. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 500 and ANT 600.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 505 Ethnohistory

    Prerequisite: ANT 226 and 80 hours.

    The use of documents, maps, photos, recordings, oral histories, artifacts, folklore, linguistics, and ethnography to reconstruct the culture history of a social or ethnic group, particularly historically marginalized peoples such as Native Americans. May be taught concurrently with ANT 605. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 505 and ANT 605. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 510 Ethnographic Field Methods

    Prerequisite: ANT 226 and 80 hours.

    Ethnographic methods and techniques in the study of culture, with emphasis on participant-observation, interviewing, note-taking and management, data analysis, and ethics. May be taught concurrently with ANT 611. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 611 and ANT 510. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 514 Anthropology of Development

    Prerequisite: ANT 226 and 75 hours.

    This course examines theories, concepts, underlying assumptions, and case studies about aid and other assistance to developing nations. It will consider the various meanings given to development by residents of particular regions, as well as those of aid workers, policy makers, private industries, non-governmental and non-profit organizations, and government officials. The course will examine how development projects and policies in areas such as public health and food systems are experienced in daily life in urban and rural areas in Africa, Latin American, and Asia. Students will develop critical thinking skills about the role of culture in the complex and diverse world of international aid. May be taught concurrently with ANT 614. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 514 and ANT 614.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 515 Medical Anthropology

    An examination of health, illness and healing from an applied anthropological perspective, Medical anthropology is one of the largest fields in the discipline of anthropology today, and one that has obvious applications. Topics may include: evolutionary perspectives on illness, the cultural construction of illness, cross-cultural variations in illness and healing, ethnomedical beliefs and practices, shamanism and other forms of symbolic healing, ethnobotany, and relations between biomedicine and ethnomedicine. May be taught concurrently with ANT 615. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 515 and ANT 615.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 516 Anthropology of Tourism

    Prerequisite: ANT 226 and 75 hours.

    Tourism is a huge, powerful, and problematic industry that is having profound effects on peoples and cultures around the globe today, particularly in societies traditionally studied by anthropologists. The anthropological study of tourism seeks to understand the motives and experiences of the tourist, the relationships between "hosts" and "guests", and the impacts of the industry on communities, cultures, and identities. This course pays particular attention to ethnic, cultural, and heritage tourism and to "best practices" that promote sustainable community development as well as social justice and cultural preservation. May be taught concurrently with ANT 616. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 516 and ANT 616.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 525 North American Indians Today

    Prerequisite: ANT 325 or 80 hours.

    Focuses on major developments in North American Indian life in the 20th and 21st centuries, including cultural, social, economic, political, environmental, and legal issues that affect Native Americans today. May be taught concurrently with ANT 626. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 626 and ANT 525. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 545 Cultural Resource Management

    Prerequisite: ANT 240; 80 hours; and permission of instructor.

    An examination of laws and regulations pertaining to the preservation of American history and culture and the professional management and preservation of ethnic, historic, and prehistoric cultural resources. May be taught concurrently with ANT 645. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 545 and ANT 645. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 550 Advanced Methods in Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 240 and 80 hours.

    Advanced study and practice in methods and techniques employed in archaeology such as lithic, ceramic, and faunal analysis. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes. May be taught concurrently with ANT 650. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 650 and ANT 550 for the same topic.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 551 Lithics

    Prerequisite: ANT 240; and 60 hours; and permission of instructor.

    An introduction to the study of prehistoric stone tools. Classes will include both a seminar component devoted to fundamental theoretical and methodological issues and a hands-on component designed to instruct students on the manufacture, identification and analysis of flaked stone artifacts. Students will become familiar with the major issues in lithic analysis, gain a basic understanding of flint knapping and, by the end of the course, will be prepared to conduct basic lithic research on their own. May be taught concurrently with ANT 651. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 551 and ANT 651.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 552 Zooarchaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 240; and 60 hours; and permission of instructor.

    An introduction to the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Classes will include both a seminar component devoted to fundamental theoretical and methodological issues and a hands-on component designed to instruct students in vertebrate osteology and the identification and analysis of animal remains. Students will become familiar with the major issues in zooarchaeology, will gain a basic understanding of the vertebrate skeleton, and by the end of the course, will be prepared to conduct basic faunal research on their own. May be taught concurrently with ANT 652. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 552 and ANT 652.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 555 Archaeological Theory

    Prerequisite: ANT 240; and 80 hours; and permission of instructor.

    A comprehensive and in-depth examination of theoretical issues and perspectives concerning the practice of archaeology and the interpretation of archaeological remains. May be taught concurrently with ANT 655. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 555 and ANT 655.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 595 History of Anthropological Theory

    Prerequisite: ANT 226 and 80 hours.

    Senior culminating course for Anthropology majors. This course traces the development of anthropology and anthropological theory, with emphasis on the major theorists and schools of thought in the twentieth century.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 596 Directed Readings in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 6 hours of ANT and permission of instructor.

    Readings designed to supplement material introduced in previous anthropology courses. Includes a wide selection of literature in the field. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours. Cannot receive credit for more than 6 hours of ANT 596 and ANT 696 combined.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 598 Seminar in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instructor.

    A detailed investigation and analysis of a specialized or advanced topic of interest to anthropology (e.g., Upper Paleolithic art, the evolution of human behavior, ethnographies of religion). May be repeated when topic changes. Variable content course. May be taught concurrently with ANT 698. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 698 and ANT 598.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 599 Directed Research in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 9 hours in Anthropology and permission of instructor.

    Individual or group research involving supervised collection and analysis of cultural data. May be repeated to a total of 9 hours.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 600 Applied Cultural Anthropology

    An introduction to the practice of applied anthropology, which is the application of anthropological methods, theories, and knowledge to the problems of society. Applied anthropology is the fastest growing field of anthropology today and provides a basis for many careers. We will examine the role of anthropologists in areas such as foreign aid and development projects, migrant and refugee services, disasters and humanitarian assistance, human rights issues, business and industry, health and medicine, tourism, environmental protection, fisheries management, the military, and cultural preservation. May be taught concurrently with ANT 500. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 500 and ANT 600.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 605 Ethnohistory

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    The use of documents, maps, photos, recordings, oral histories, artifacts, folklore, linguistics, and ethnography to reconstruct the culture history of a social or ethnic group, particularly historically marginalized peoples such as Native Americans. May be taught concurrently with ANT 505. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 605 and ANT 505.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 611 Ethnographic Field Methods

    Ethnographic methods and techniques in the study of culture, with emphasis on participant-observation, interviewing, note-taking and management, data analysis, and ethics. May be taught concurrently with ANT 510. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 510 and ANT 611.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 614 Anthropology of Development

    This course examines theories, concepts, underlying assumptions, and case studies about aid and other assistance to developing nations. It will consider the various meanings given to development by residents of particular regions, as well as those of aid workers, policy makers, private industries, non-governmental and non-profit organizations, and government officials. The course will examine how development projects and policies in areas such as public health and food systems are experienced in daily life in urban and rural areas in Africa, Latin American, and Asia. Students will develop critical thinking skills about the role of culture in the complex and diverse world of international aid. May be taught concurrently with ANT 514. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 514 and ANT 614.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 615 Medical Anthropology

    An examination of health, illness and healing from an applied anthropological perspective, Medical anthropology is one of the largest fields in the discipline of anthropology today, and one that has obvious applications. Topics may include: evolutionary perspectives on illness, the cultural construction of illness, cross-cultural variations in illness and healing, ethnomedical beliefs and practices, shamanism and other forms of symbolic healing, ethnobotany, and relations between biomedicine and ethnomedicine. May be taught concurrently with ANT 515. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 615 and ANT 515.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 616 Anthropology of Tourism

    Tourism is a huge, powerful, and problematic industry that is having profound effects on peoples and cultures around the globe today, particularly in societies traditionally studied by anthropologists. The anthropological study of tourism seeks to understand the motives and experiences of the tourist, the relationships between "hosts" and "guests", and the impacts of the industry on communities, cultures, and identities. This course pays particular attention to ethnic, cultural, and heritage tourism and to "best practices" that promote sustainable community development as well as social justice and cultural preservation. May be taught concurrently with ANT 516. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 516 and ANT 616.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 626 North American Indians Today

    Focuses on major developments in North American Indian life in the 20th and 21st centuries, including cultural, social, economic, political, environmental, and legal issues that affect Native Americans today. May be taught concurrently with ANT 525. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 525 and ANT 626.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 645 Cultural Resource Management

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    An examination of laws and regulations pertaining to the preservation of American history and culture and the professional management and preservation of ethnic, historic, and prehistoric cultural resources. May be taught concurrently with ANT 545. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 645 and ANT 545.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 650 Advanced Methods in Archaeology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Advanced study and practice in methods and techniques employed in archaeology such as lithic, ceramic, and faunal analysis. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes. May be taught concurrently with ANT 550. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 650 and ANT 550 for the same topic.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 651 Lithics

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    An introduction to the study of prehistoric stone tools. Classes will include both a seminar component devoted to fundamental theoretical and methodological issues and a hands-on component designed to instruct students on the manufacture, identification and analysis of flaked stone artifacts. Students will become familiar with the major issues in lithic analysis, gain a basic understanding of flint knapping and, by the end of the course, will be prepared to conduct basic lithic research on their own. May be taught concurrently with ANT 551. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 651 and ANT 551.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 652 Zooarchaeology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    An introduction to the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Classes will include both a seminar component devoted to fundamental theoretical and methodological issues and a hands-on component designed to instruct students in vertebrate osteology and the identification and analysis of animal remains. Students will become familiar with the major issues in zooarchaeology, will gain a basic understanding of the vertebrate skeleton, and by the end of the course, will be prepared to conduct basic faunal research on their own. May be taught concurrently with ANT 552. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 652 and ANT 552.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 655 Archaeological Theory

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    A comprehensive and in-depth examination of theoretical issues and perspectives concerning the practice of archaeology and the interpretation of archaeological remains. May be taught concurrently with ANT 555. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 655 and ANT 555.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 695 History of Anthropological Theory

    This course traces the development of anthropology and anthropological theory, with emphasis on the major theorists and schools of thought in the twentieth century. May be taught concurrently with ANT 595. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 595 and ANT 695.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 698 Seminar in Anthropology

    A detailed investigation and analysis of a specialized or advanced topic of interest to anthropology (e.g., Upper Paleolithic art, the evolution of human behavior, ethnographies of religion). May be repeated when topic changes. Variable content course. May be taught concurrently with ANT 598. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 598 and ANT 698.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 701 Graduate Colloquium in Applied Anthropology

    Prerequisite: acceptance into a graduate program in Anthropology.

    An introduction to graduate study, careers, and professionalization in applied anthropology. Incoming students will interact with faculty, advanced graduate students, and professionals in the field to explore opportunities for internships and graduate projects, and will develop relevant professional skills to prepare them for their career track.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 705 Anthropological Theory and Practice

    Prerequisite: admission to the Applied Anthropology MS Program or permission of instructor.

    Examines anthropological theories and how they are translated into practice in the context of scholarly and applied anthropology. Topics include the history of anthropological theory, the application of theory in all subfields, and contemporary trends.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 720 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology

    Recommended Prerequisite: introductory course in statistics. Uses of quantitative methods and databases in the field of anthropology, with particular emphasis on applied research.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 751 Graduate Field Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 351 or equivalent.

    This course offers field experience in the techniques and methods used in archaeological survey and excavations. Graduate students will gain experience planning investigations and supervising crews of undergraduate students and will contribute to reporting the results of research. Variable credit course. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    1-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 770 Research Design and Writing in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: ANT 700.

    How to plan and conduct a research project in applied anthropology and prepare grant proposals, contract reports, journal publications, and other professional documents in anthropology.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 790 Internship in Applied Anthropology

    Prerequisite: ANT 701 and permission of instructor.

    A minimum of 200 hours of work experience as an applied anthropologist with an approved business, organization, program, or agency. Requires a written report and a public presentation. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    0
    Lab contact hours:
    6

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 795 Directed Readings in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Supervised readings in preparation for a practicum or thesis project.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 796 Directed Research in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Supervised research necessary for completion of a master's degree.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 797 Practicum in Applied Anthropology

    Prerequisite: ANT 770 and permission of instructor.

    The student will conduct an applied research project from start to finish, culminating in a professional report. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hours:
    3-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • ANT 799 Thesis

    Prerequisite: ANT 770 and permission of instructor.

    Research and writing of a masters thesis under the direction of a faculty advisor. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hours:
    3-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings